This article is about the river in Assam. For the river in Bangladesh|Seabed Abysmal z35W7z4v9z8w

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April 18, 2017

This article is about the river in Assam. For the river in Bangladesh




Dhansiri is the main river of Golaghat District of Assam and the Dimapur District of Nagaland. It originates from Laisang peak of Nagaland. It flows through a distance of 352 kilometres (219 mi) from south to north before joining the Brahmaputra on its south bank. Its total catchment area is 1,220 square kilometres (470 sq mi).[1] While flowing as the boundary between Karbi Anglong and Nagaland, it flanks a large wilderness very rich in wildlife. On one side is the Dhansiri Reserved Forest and on the other Intanki National Park.[2] It has several types of important wood bearing trees along its bank like Intanki Forest.[3] Dhansari river along with Kapili by headward erosion has completely isolated the Mikir hills from the Peninsular plateau. There are numerous perennially waterlogged swampy region locally known as bils associated with this riverMora Dhansiri is a tributary of the Dhansiri River, the main river of Golaghat District in the state of Assam, India. It originates from Laisang peak of Nagaland and passes through Kaziranga National Park. It flows through a distance of 352 kilometres (219 mi) from south to north before joining the Brahmaputra River on its south bank. Its total catchment area is 1,220 square kilometres Water flow is the key factor in lotic systems influencing their ecology. The strength of water flow can vary between systems, ranging from torrential rapids to slow backwaters that almost seem like lentic systems. The speed of the water flow can also vary within a system and is subject to chaotic turbulence. This turbulence results in divergences of flow from the mean downslope flow vector as typified by eddy currents. The mean flow rate vector is based on variability of friction with the bottom or sides of the channel, sinuosity, obstructions, and the incline gradient.[3] In addition, the amount of water input into the system from direct precipitation, snowmelt, and/or groundwater can affect flow rate. Flowing waters can alter the shape of the streambed through erosion and deposition, creating a variety of habitats, including riffles, glides, and pools

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